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05-Aug-2019 12:15

Just once, I would like to hear it referred to as a financial crisis.” Barbara CLIFF, Johnstown, Penn.

“Continually referred to as ‘the so-called fiscal cliff,’ followed by a definition. “Fiscal cliff, fiscal update, fiscal austerity…whatever happened to ‘economic’ updates? “Makes me want to throw someone over a real cliff,” Donna, Johnstown, NY “If only those who utter these words would take a giant leap off of it.” Joann Eschenburg, Clinton Twp., Mich.

“(We’ve) lost sight of the metaphor and started to think it’s a real place, like with the headline, ‘Obama, Boehner meeting on fiscal cliff’.” Barry Cochran, Portland, Ore.

“Tends to be used however the speaker wishes to use it, as in falling off the fiscal cliff, climbing the fiscal cliff, challenged by the fiscal cliff, etc.

Facing third and fifteen without your best receiver with tens of millions in the bank, is not.” – Kyle, White Lake, Mich. As one might expect, this phrase received the most nominations this year.

“From the world of sports comes the latest example of word inflation. If Congress acts to keep the country from tumbling over the cliff, LSSU believes this banishment should get some of the credit. I’m equally worried about the River of Debt and Mountain of Despair.”Christopher Loiselle, Midland, Mich.

“The word suggests that we develop relationships not for the simple value of the person we call ‘friend,’ for the pleasure of being in a community of people and for the simple joys of sharing bonds of affection and common care, but that we instead develop these relationships out of some sort of expectation of a monetary reward.” – Collette Coullard, Sault Ste. Early in 2014, Steve Kaufman of Houston, Tex., could be heard screaming, “I’ve only heard it twice and already know by the end of the year I’ll want to scream.” “Short-form for ‘crazy’ and sometimes just one ‘cra.’ I hear kids (including my 6 yr. ‘That snowstorm yesterday was ‘cra-cra.'” – Esther Proulx, Sault Ste. Further, I am not aware of any team or mascot that has the carrying capacity to be a nation.” – Kelly Frawley, Waunakee, Wisc. “People have taken pictures of themselves for almost as long as George Eastman’s company made film and cameras. “I twitch when I hear twerk, for to twerk proves one is a jerk — or is at least twitching like a jerk. “Society is changing and no longer is it odd for a man to take care of his children. “Every passing storm or event is tagged as ice-ageddon or snow-pocalypse.

“Nothing more self-aggrandizing than sport team fans referring to themselves as a nation! Suddenly, with the advent of smartphones, snapping a ‘pic’ of one’s own image has acquired a vastly overused term that seems to pop up on almost every form of social media available to us…. Twerking has brought us to a new low in our lexicon.” – Lisa, New York, NY “Time to dance this one off the stage.” – Jim, Flagstaff, Ariz. There’s a limited supply of …ageddons and …pocalypses; I believe it’s one, each.

“The newest dictionary entry should leave just as quickly.” – Bruce, Edmonton, Alb. Now it is seeping from the Twittersphere into everyday expression. #annoying #stopthat #hashtag #hashtag #hashtag .” – Alex, Rochester, Mich. The 30-year anniversary of this hilarious 1983 Michael Keaton movie seems to have released some pent-up emotions. “It was a funny movie in its time, but the phrase should refer only to the film, not to men in the real world. ” says Pat, of Chicago, who suggests we peruse the website captaindad.org, the manly blog of stay-at-home parenting. Politicians never fail to disappoint in providing fodder for the list.“The term itself is stupid, and the campaign and petition written by men’s rights activists claiming that men need to take up more space due to their anatomy, and that anti-manspreading campaigns are ‘male-bashing,’ are ridiculous. If I was putting someone ‘before anything else,’ I would respect them enough to use their name.” — S. Also, the concept ‘before anybody else,’ developed AFTER the word became popular. “I’d rather be called ‘babe’ than ‘bae’ any day.” — Alexsis Outwater, Bronson, Mich. — Dawn Farrell, Kanata, Ont., Canada “Enough with the over-sensationalized words to describe weather! Prescott, Oshawa, Ont., Canada “I think most, if not all can agree that we would prefer to avoid the polar vortex in the future, both in name and in embodiment.” — Christine Brace, Westminster, Md. Louis Post-Dispatch editorializes about a ‘political vortex.'” “Suddenly things that once would have been called ‘tips’ are now being called ‘hacks.’ It can’t be because the one word is shorter or easier to say; and the actual accepted meanings of ‘hack’ have nothing to do with suggestions for doing tasks better or more efficiently — quite the opposite, really.” – Sharla Hulsey, Sac City, Iowa. What they really mean is ‘tip’ or ‘short cut,’ but clearly it is not a ‘hack,’ as it involves no legal or ethical impropriety or breach of security.” – Peter P. There are probably even hacking hacks.” – Chellsea Mastroine, Canton, Ohio. We already have a perfectly good word in ‘skills’ (ending with an s, not a z).” – Chip Lupo, Columbia, S. I’m kind of a sleepie.'” – Andy Poe, Marquette, Mich.The problem is with people taking up too much space on the subway or any public mode of transportation. “Life hack, this hack, that hack…stop with the hacks! “I crave good sleep, too, but that does not make me a sleepie. Sounds like ‘foodie’ is a synonym for ‘everybody.’ Foodies around the world agree; let’s banish this term.” – Steve Szilagyi, Mason, Mich. Online publications invite us to “join the conversation,” which is usually more of a scream-fest. wonders if “debate has become too harsh for our delicate sensibilities. We are invited to “join the conversation if we want to give an opinion. Thanks for listening, eh.” – Debbie Irwin, Sault Ste. “A corporate-academic weasel word,” according to the Urban Dictionary. “It has become widespread to the point of an epidemic,” said a sickened John from Philadelphia, Penn.

“The newest dictionary entry should leave just as quickly.” – Bruce, Edmonton, Alb. Now it is seeping from the Twittersphere into everyday expression. #annoying #stopthat #hashtag #hashtag #hashtag .” – Alex, Rochester, Mich. The 30-year anniversary of this hilarious 1983 Michael Keaton movie seems to have released some pent-up emotions. “It was a funny movie in its time, but the phrase should refer only to the film, not to men in the real world. ” says Pat, of Chicago, who suggests we peruse the website captaindad.org, the manly blog of stay-at-home parenting. Politicians never fail to disappoint in providing fodder for the list.

“The term itself is stupid, and the campaign and petition written by men’s rights activists claiming that men need to take up more space due to their anatomy, and that anti-manspreading campaigns are ‘male-bashing,’ are ridiculous. If I was putting someone ‘before anything else,’ I would respect them enough to use their name.” — S. Also, the concept ‘before anybody else,’ developed AFTER the word became popular. “I’d rather be called ‘babe’ than ‘bae’ any day.” — Alexsis Outwater, Bronson, Mich. — Dawn Farrell, Kanata, Ont., Canada “Enough with the over-sensationalized words to describe weather! Prescott, Oshawa, Ont., Canada “I think most, if not all can agree that we would prefer to avoid the polar vortex in the future, both in name and in embodiment.” — Christine Brace, Westminster, Md. Louis Post-Dispatch editorializes about a ‘political vortex.'” “Suddenly things that once would have been called ‘tips’ are now being called ‘hacks.’ It can’t be because the one word is shorter or easier to say; and the actual accepted meanings of ‘hack’ have nothing to do with suggestions for doing tasks better or more efficiently — quite the opposite, really.” – Sharla Hulsey, Sac City, Iowa. What they really mean is ‘tip’ or ‘short cut,’ but clearly it is not a ‘hack,’ as it involves no legal or ethical impropriety or breach of security.” – Peter P. There are probably even hacking hacks.” – Chellsea Mastroine, Canton, Ohio. We already have a perfectly good word in ‘skills’ (ending with an s, not a z).” – Chip Lupo, Columbia, S. I’m kind of a sleepie.'” – Andy Poe, Marquette, Mich.

The problem is with people taking up too much space on the subway or any public mode of transportation. “Life hack, this hack, that hack…stop with the hacks! “I crave good sleep, too, but that does not make me a sleepie. Sounds like ‘foodie’ is a synonym for ‘everybody.’ Foodies around the world agree; let’s banish this term.” – Steve Szilagyi, Mason, Mich.

Online publications invite us to “join the conversation,” which is usually more of a scream-fest. wonders if “debate has become too harsh for our delicate sensibilities. We are invited to “join the conversation if we want to give an opinion. Thanks for listening, eh.” – Debbie Irwin, Sault Ste. “A corporate-academic weasel word,” according to the Urban Dictionary.

“It has become widespread to the point of an epidemic,” said a sickened John from Philadelphia, Penn.

1171, which says, “Although the ‘price point’ of effective new drugs…may initially be out of reach for many patients…” “It has no ‘point.’ It is just a ‘price.’” – Guy Michael, Cherry Hill, N. “Usually used in a sentence explaining the ‘secret’ in excruciating public detail. “Whether it’s a ‘free gift’ (banished in 1988) or droopy clothing, this word is neither useful nor fancy.” – Jeff Drake, Saint Albans, West Va.