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01-Jun-2019 15:13

Nor do we buy the hypothesis of executive coach Olivia Fox Cabane, who says, While prehistoric men were out hunting, the women were being engineered to focus on social ties for survival.

Therefore, a book that can give women a competitive social edge, such as bagging the right guy, understanding her teen, sharpening her gossiping skills or learning to differentiate between friend and frenemy, would be eagerly sought out by them Among evolutionary explanations for modern phenomena — already a pretty suspect group — the idea that women have been "engineered" to buy He's Just Not That Into You is especially reductive and silly.

Blakeley's article is based on the claim that women are buying the lion's share of self-help books.

74% of relationship and family books in 2008 were apparently purchased by women, and the Times' latest paperback advice bestseller list is certainly packed with titles targeting women (Hungry Girl 200 Under 200, Skinny Bitch, and How Not To Look Old are a few standouts).

This leads us to suspect that while some of the big-splash hardcovers of the self-help genre may appeal to both genders, publishers are making a lot of their money on paperback copies of the Same Old Shit — variants on How Not to Be Fat, Old, Or Alone, marketed to women.

Responses to — and explanations for — this gender disparity vary.

It also means every night is “date night.” So the way it used to work—with time to plan what you’d wear, where you’d take her, and so on—has changed. Keep a change of clothes at work, along with some deodorizing wipes and mouthwash, because who knows what’s in store.

“Sometimes women, like men, drop their standards so they can get what they want sooner,” Kerner says.

In sex, just like sports, it pays to play by the rules. In football, o„fficials moved the restraining line from the 30-yard line to the 35, with the intention of increasing touchbacks.

Play by these new rules and you’ll score again and again. NEW: Women checking men out.● Think your zipper’s undone? Using eye-tracking technology, scientists from the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction found that women are actually more likely to have wandering eyes than men.

Women not only spent less time looking at a man’s face (when compared with men looking at women); they also moved more quickly onto his other body parts. “So take in her breasts or legs, but don’t dwell on them.” And make the most of your assets, too.

It requires us to believe that hunting isn't social, that women didn't hunt, that what men and women may or may not have done in prehistory determines what we do now (the biggest and dumbest assumption of a lot of evolutionary psychology), that human social life can be understood in terms of "competitive social edge," and that self-help books could actually give a woman such an edge.

In reality, lots of self-help books play on — and perpetuate — low self-esteem (something gender studies expert BJ Gallagher erroneously tells Forbes is the province of women), and aren't likely to give anyone any kind of "edge" at all.

In sex, just like sports, it pays to play by the rules. In football, o„fficials moved the restraining line from the 30-yard line to the 35, with the intention of increasing touchbacks.Play by these new rules and you’ll score again and again. NEW: Women checking men out.● Think your zipper’s undone? Using eye-tracking technology, scientists from the Kinsey Institute for Research in Sex, Gender, and Reproduction found that women are actually more likely to have wandering eyes than men.Women not only spent less time looking at a man’s face (when compared with men looking at women); they also moved more quickly onto his other body parts. “So take in her breasts or legs, but don’t dwell on them.” And make the most of your assets, too.It requires us to believe that hunting isn't social, that women didn't hunt, that what men and women may or may not have done in prehistory determines what we do now (the biggest and dumbest assumption of a lot of evolutionary psychology), that human social life can be understood in terms of "competitive social edge," and that self-help books could actually give a woman such an edge.In reality, lots of self-help books play on — and perpetuate — low self-esteem (something gender studies expert BJ Gallagher erroneously tells Forbes is the province of women), and aren't likely to give anyone any kind of "edge" at all.And in basketball, o„fficials dumped the no-dunk rule after fans complained that it made play less exciting.