Cia dating policy

02-Jun-2019 02:41

“The [Vietcong] continually learned from their mistakes, and their political officers wrote up these long boring papers at least once a week, recounting their strong and weak points,” Walter Mc Intosh, a former CIA chief of Vietnam operations, told Not everyone agrees.

Merle Pribbenow, a former CIA operations officer who spent five years in Vietnam and has devoted much of the past decade since his retirement translating and analyzing internal Communist documents, said the PSS’s attempts at self-criticism were often perfunctory.

In a filing, their attorneys argue that Mr Mitchell and Mr Jessen’s role advising the CIA on its treatment of “high-value detainees” ceased in 2002, meaning “there is no connection” between the techniques they proposed and the treatment of the three men on whose behalf the ACLU is suing.

It rejects the ACLU’s contention that those techniques were intended to reduce detainees to a state of “complete helplessness.” But the participation of the psychologists in some aspects of the CIA’s interrogation programme is not in doubt.

It describes “waves of arrests..caused us extremely regrettable losses and damage,” which were the result of “physical violence and torture, forcing people to make statements, putting words in their mouths, and then arresting everyone implicated by the suspects during torture.”The PSS blamed the excesses on “professional immaturity,” according to the documents.

Interrogators were driven by desperation to get quick results and to get ahead.

During the Communist occupation of Cambodia in 1983, Bui Tin recounted, torture once again led Hanoi’s intelligence officers to believe that there were traitors in their ranks, in this case pro-Vietnamese Cambodian officials in Siem Reap province.“The greatest error had been made by Vietnamese military intelligence, which out of a desire to make a name for themselves had put words into the mouths of the prisoners they were interrogating,” Bui Tin wrote.

“The ‘professional methods’ they had used were torture and sophisticated physical abuse: not allowing the prisoners to sleep, questioning the prisoners around the clock to put them under extreme psychological tension; forcing them to go without food and water and then telling them that they would not be given anything to eat or drink until they confessed, etc.” These techniques are akin to the mildest tactics used by the CIA.

Mc Cain’s plane was shot down over North Vietnam, and he endured nearly six years of torture at what the POWs sarcastically called “the Hanoi Hilton.” The “Hilton” was a PSS prison.But as the Communists captured more and more Americans, Pribbenow said, the intelligence agency turned over part of the facility to the army, which brought in its own interrogators.As with the infamous Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, the former CIA officer said, the worst abuses in the Hanoi Hilton were carried out by army personnel, not the intelligence professionals, though some of them were guilty as well.Even leaders of Communist Vietnam’s wartime intelligence agency, notorious for torturing American POWs, privately knew that “enhanced interrogation techniques,” as the CIA calls them, could create more problems than solutions, according to internal Vietnamese documents reviewed by In many cases, torturing people wrongly suspected of being enemy spies caused “extremely regrettable losses and damage,” says one of the documents, released to little notice in 1993 by Hanoi’s all-powerful Public Security Service (PSS).But unlike the CIA, Vietnam’s security service constantly engaged in Marxist-style “self-criticism” to review its mistakes, particularly those caused by relying on confessions extracted by torture, the recently translated Communist documents show.

Mc Cain’s plane was shot down over North Vietnam, and he endured nearly six years of torture at what the POWs sarcastically called “the Hanoi Hilton.” The “Hilton” was a PSS prison.

But as the Communists captured more and more Americans, Pribbenow said, the intelligence agency turned over part of the facility to the army, which brought in its own interrogators.

As with the infamous Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq, the former CIA officer said, the worst abuses in the Hanoi Hilton were carried out by army personnel, not the intelligence professionals, though some of them were guilty as well.

Even leaders of Communist Vietnam’s wartime intelligence agency, notorious for torturing American POWs, privately knew that “enhanced interrogation techniques,” as the CIA calls them, could create more problems than solutions, according to internal Vietnamese documents reviewed by In many cases, torturing people wrongly suspected of being enemy spies caused “extremely regrettable losses and damage,” says one of the documents, released to little notice in 1993 by Hanoi’s all-powerful Public Security Service (PSS).

But unlike the CIA, Vietnam’s security service constantly engaged in Marxist-style “self-criticism” to review its mistakes, particularly those caused by relying on confessions extracted by torture, the recently translated Communist documents show.

“A reconnaissance team member who one day went out to arrest someone would suddenly be arrested the very next day,” the documents said.