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30-Mar-2019 23:00

“If we are to value human interaction ~ the old-fashioned kind, where we sit and talk over coffee or tea or where we can reach out and touch the other person ~ then being ‘plugged in’ constantly diminishes our social lives,” Hartsell said.“Since people are spending more and more time on the computer or using their other electronic devices for any number of functions, I think many people are putting less value on human relationships and physically present interactions.Because time is not infinite, there will always be trade-offs.

“NBA on TNT” aired a clip Thursday of Cleveland Cavaliers point guard Isaiah Thomas having a conversation with his children and one them called Shaq fat. Bob Corker (R-TN) in an interview with fill-in host Dana Bash.

Peer and social networking sites and instant messaging does bring people together geographically who were removed from one another into each other’s lives more casually, making it a daily interactive stream.

Technology allows those interactions to occur more frequently, allows a person to stay updated about their friends’ and families’ lives and can actually create stronger bonds.

The flipside, though, is that there’s the potential for people to rely too heavily on these technologies ~ almost as crutches ~ rather than engaging with ‘real’ people in the traditional ways, [such as] going out face-to-face for a drink.

[They may say], “Oh I’m all caught up in your life through Twitter, so I don’t really need to try [with] catch up with you face-to-face.’” The problem gets even more complicated when you factor in that the technology can follow people everywhere they go, and may (and certainly does) invade personal space and face time.

“NBA on TNT” aired a clip Thursday of Cleveland Cavaliers point guard Isaiah Thomas having a conversation with his children and one them called Shaq fat. Bob Corker (R-TN) in an interview with fill-in host Dana Bash.Peer and social networking sites and instant messaging does bring people together geographically who were removed from one another into each other’s lives more casually, making it a daily interactive stream.Technology allows those interactions to occur more frequently, allows a person to stay updated about their friends’ and families’ lives and can actually create stronger bonds.The flipside, though, is that there’s the potential for people to rely too heavily on these technologies ~ almost as crutches ~ rather than engaging with ‘real’ people in the traditional ways, [such as] going out face-to-face for a drink.[They may say], “Oh I’m all caught up in your life through Twitter, so I don’t really need to try [with] catch up with you face-to-face.’” The problem gets even more complicated when you factor in that the technology can follow people everywhere they go, and may (and certainly does) invade personal space and face time.And even more important, what of a individuals social and emotional skills?