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03-Sep-2019 01:10

Stewards – being helpful characters – obliged in some cases. One of the things the Falklands /Malvinas experience meant for gay men (and their detractors) was that the presence and bravery of camp civilians under fire undermined the stereotype of gay men as cowards. Other camp men were proud of being visibly hyper-masculine, in at least some ways.

Also, as Bernie, the Captain’s Steward on the explained, many formed affectionate bonds with their passengers, including Argentinean prisoners. They agreed to learn how to use the ship’s guns when volunteers were asked for. As Wendy said “I may be a Mary but I’m as hard as the next.

They also sailed for the adventure or even for Maggie Thatcher (a camp icon) and the principle of Falklands Islands sovereignty.

Before troops embarked their officers ‘warned’ there would be homosexuals on board.

Is this what the public imagine men were saying, as we hear all the patriotic razzmatazz about British ships full of military men bristling with weaponry steaming around the South Atlantic to attack Argentineans? It doesn’t fit the story of rufty-tufty Brits, including Marines and Paras sailing forth in the hyper-masculine style of imperial conquest. Roy ‘Wendy’ Gibson was one of possibly hundreds of camp men among the 7,000 merchant seafarers who took the troops to war and supported them while they were there fighting.The Certainly no squaddies could afford to be seen as having gay sex, even as a one-off act of domination or a way of getting contingent ‘relief’. Maybe us gays were better off than some of the straight people, because when we was frightened we could say ‘I’m frightened’ …In that nosy community their mates would have jeered. And an unanticipated phenomenon occurred: some military men felt they didn’t want to die without having tried intercourse with a man. we could let it out.” And many, like the women on board, acted as agony aunts to traumatised troops afterwards.But they, like the other veterans, are proud of their medals.And in some cases they’re beset by Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.

Is this what the public imagine men were saying, as we hear all the patriotic razzmatazz about British ships full of military men bristling with weaponry steaming around the South Atlantic to attack Argentineans? It doesn’t fit the story of rufty-tufty Brits, including Marines and Paras sailing forth in the hyper-masculine style of imperial conquest. Roy ‘Wendy’ Gibson was one of possibly hundreds of camp men among the 7,000 merchant seafarers who took the troops to war and supported them while they were there fighting.The Certainly no squaddies could afford to be seen as having gay sex, even as a one-off act of domination or a way of getting contingent ‘relief’. Maybe us gays were better off than some of the straight people, because when we was frightened we could say ‘I’m frightened’ …In that nosy community their mates would have jeered. And an unanticipated phenomenon occurred: some military men felt they didn’t want to die without having tried intercourse with a man. we could let it out.” And many, like the women on board, acted as agony aunts to traumatised troops afterwards.But they, like the other veterans, are proud of their medals.And in some cases they’re beset by Post Traumatic Stress Disorder.This is largely because he appeared in so many paratroopers’ memoirs, most notably Ken Lukowiak’s , 52 merchant vessels had to help out instead. These STUFT (Ships Taken Up For Trade) vessels were camp men’s homes and workplaces.