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22-Aug-2019 05:19

Here is an interesting monument from central Bosnia with inscription for which it is difficult to decide is it Croatian glagolitic, cyrillic, or something else: We illustrate some of numerous very interesting monuments of Croatian Cyrillic from the Makarska area, see [fra Karlo Jurisic].

In the same monograph one can find an extremely interesting example of official correspondence with Turkish officials in Herzegovina written in Croatian Cyrillic in 1498, dealing with the destiny of franciscans in Zaostrog, see [fra Karlo Jurisic, pp. In the town of Zagvozd behind the beautiful mountain of Biokovo one can see a lovely Catholic church of all Saints with Croatian Cyrillic inscription from 1644: Here is a fascinating example of Three Script character of Croatian Middle Ages (that is, parallel usage of Glagolitic, Cyrillic and Latin scripts).

Especially important is the Poljice Statute of the small Principality in the neighbourhood of Split (1440). The Poljica statute, a famous Croatian Cyrillic legal document.

This is a version from 1665, kept in the National and University Library in Zagreb.

The same book was published in Croatian Glagolitic Script in 1562/63, prepared by the same persons.

Reprints of these books have been published in 2008 by the Theological Faculty "Matija Vlačić Ilirik" in Zagreb, where you can find more information.

Peter in the Wood, 12th century), where in one single word - Amen - all three Scripts are used!

Kočerin tablet from 1410 or 1411, kept in the Franciscan Museum in Ljubuški, Bosnia and Herzegovina There exists a significant number of Croatian Cyrillic codices, chronicles, healers' pharmacopoeias, registers of births, testaments, personal correspondence etc.The oldest preserved version is from 1440., and it is known to have been based on even older manuscripts. Vladisic written in the famous fortress of Klis near Split in 1436 (transcription from 1448).V ime Bozje, se lezi Radovan Pribilovic, na svojoj zemlji plemenitoj, na Ricici; bih s bratom se razmenio, i ubi me Milko Bozinic, sa svojom bratijom; a brata mi isikose i ucnise vrhu mene krv nezaimitnu vrhu; Nek (zna) tko je moj mili.According to Croatian researcher Josip Hamm, members of the Bosnian Church (Krstyans) particularly appreciated the Glagolitic Script. The letter is written in cursive bosanchitsa script – a variety of Cyrillic used mainly by the Catholic and Moslem population of Bosnia and Herzegovina.Namely, all the important Bosnian Church books, (or the Dubrovnik breviary, or Oficje) published in Venice in 1512, prepared by Franjo Ratkovic from Dubrovnik. [Cyrillic mentioned Here is Croatian Cyrillic, while Catholic population in Bosnia is Croatian population, as well as a part of Moslem population.

Kočerin tablet from 1410 or 1411, kept in the Franciscan Museum in Ljubuški, Bosnia and Herzegovina There exists a significant number of Croatian Cyrillic codices, chronicles, healers' pharmacopoeias, registers of births, testaments, personal correspondence etc.The oldest preserved version is from 1440., and it is known to have been based on even older manuscripts. Vladisic written in the famous fortress of Klis near Split in 1436 (transcription from 1448).V ime Bozje, se lezi Radovan Pribilovic, na svojoj zemlji plemenitoj, na Ricici; bih s bratom se razmenio, i ubi me Milko Bozinic, sa svojom bratijom; a brata mi isikose i ucnise vrhu mene krv nezaimitnu vrhu; Nek (zna) tko je moj mili.According to Croatian researcher Josip Hamm, members of the Bosnian Church (Krstyans) particularly appreciated the Glagolitic Script. The letter is written in cursive bosanchitsa script – a variety of Cyrillic used mainly by the Catholic and Moslem population of Bosnia and Herzegovina.Namely, all the important Bosnian Church books, (or the Dubrovnik breviary, or Oficje) published in Venice in 1512, prepared by Franjo Ratkovic from Dubrovnik. [Cyrillic mentioned Here is Croatian Cyrillic, while Catholic population in Bosnia is Croatian population, as well as a part of Moslem population.One copy is held in Paris in Bibliothque Nationale. D.Ž.] In the Royal Library of Stockholm (Kungliga biblioteket) there is a huge Czech book Gigas Librorum from the 13th century, which in the 14th century was in Prague. Here is the photo of the table of Croatian Glagolitic Script in Gigas Librorum: One can clearly see that the table is written on a separate vellum leaflet, subsequently glued to the page of Gigas Librorum.