Rules about buddhist dating

20-Jul-2019 14:10

In Japan today -- and in schools of Buddhism imported to the West from Japan -- the issue of monastic celibacy is decided differently from sect to sect and from monk to monk.

Let's go back to lay Buddhists and the vague precaution about "sexual misconduct." People mostly take cues about what constitutes "misconduct" from their culture, and we see this in much of Asian Buddhism.

Here are some examples torn from the pages of e H : 1.

A woman who is a VP of Finance at a bank and lives a life of numbers.

Without a doubt, the people who have the hardest time finding love are the ones who think they can violate this rule.

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Clerics of most schools of Buddhism in Asia continue to follow the Vinaya-pitaka, with the exception of Japan.In 1872, the Meiji government decreed that Buddhist monks and priests (but not nuns) should be free to marry if they chose to do so.Soon "temple families" became commonplace (they had existed before the decree, actually, but people pretended not to notice) and the administration of temples and monasteries often became family businesses, handed down from fathers to sons.Shinran Shonin (1173-1262), founder of the Jodo Shinshu school of Japanese Pure Land, married, and he authorized Jodo Shinshu priests to marry.In the centuries that followed, the marriage of Japanese Buddhist monks may not have been the rule, but it was a not-infrequent exception.

Clerics of most schools of Buddhism in Asia continue to follow the Vinaya-pitaka, with the exception of Japan.

In 1872, the Meiji government decreed that Buddhist monks and priests (but not nuns) should be free to marry if they chose to do so.

Soon "temple families" became commonplace (they had existed before the decree, actually, but people pretended not to notice) and the administration of temples and monasteries often became family businesses, handed down from fathers to sons.

Shinran Shonin (1173-1262), founder of the Jodo Shinshu school of Japanese Pure Land, married, and he authorized Jodo Shinshu priests to marry.

In the centuries that followed, the marriage of Japanese Buddhist monks may not have been the rule, but it was a not-infrequent exception.

He will tell you that he likes sports, but he hasn’t touched a sport in 25 years. He wants an outdoorsy, athletic woman who is built like a tennis pro and is happy to let him watch college ball all day Saturday and pro ball on Sunday.