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02-Oct-2019 08:10

For informal oral exchanges, each community employs a different idiom, known within each side as "the Cyprus dialect." Those dialects are sometimes regarded as intimate, local, and authentic idioms vis–a–vis the two standard varieties, while in other contexts they may be seen as low, vulgar, or peasant idioms. When Cyprus emerged as a state in 1960, it acquired a flag but not a national anthem.The flag shows a map of the island in orange– yellow against a white background, symbolizing the color of copper, for which the island was renowned in ancient times. The symbolism of the flag thus draws on nature rather than culture or religion.The lights of Limassol can be seen in the background.

We have touched upon almost all of them, we have solved many of them, and we are close to solving some other issues.' Akrotiri is crucial to the RAF's mission, as a refuelling and rearming centre, in the Middle East and Afghanistan.The official symbol of the 1960 state, the Republic of Cyprus, is a dove flying with an olive branch in its beak in a shield inscribed with the date 1960, all within a wreath of olive leaves, symbolizing the desire for peace.Until 1963, when interethnic conflict broke out, a neutral piece of music was played on official state occasions; after 1963, the two communities fully adopted the national anthems of Greece and Turkey.Since the 1974 division, the population statistics have been disputed.Many Turkish Cypriots left because of declining economic conditions on their side of the island, while many Turkish settlers moved in because they viewed northern Cyprus as being better off than Turkey.

We have touched upon almost all of them, we have solved many of them, and we are close to solving some other issues.' Akrotiri is crucial to the RAF's mission, as a refuelling and rearming centre, in the Middle East and Afghanistan.

The official symbol of the 1960 state, the Republic of Cyprus, is a dove flying with an olive branch in its beak in a shield inscribed with the date 1960, all within a wreath of olive leaves, symbolizing the desire for peace.

Until 1963, when interethnic conflict broke out, a neutral piece of music was played on official state occasions; after 1963, the two communities fully adopted the national anthems of Greece and Turkey.

Since the 1974 division, the population statistics have been disputed.

Many Turkish Cypriots left because of declining economic conditions on their side of the island, while many Turkish settlers moved in because they viewed northern Cyprus as being better off than Turkey.

In practice, however, Greek Cypriots often fly both the Greek flag and that of the republic, while Turkish Cypriots fly both their own flag and that of Turkey.