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During the ten years of rule by Manfredo King of Sicily, illegitimate son of Emperor Friedrich, a change in the practice of noble appointments can be observed from the primary sources, which reveal only a handful of new counts most of whom were the kings relatives on his mothers side of the family.

The holdings of Manfredos nobles were confiscated by King Charles I after his accession in 1266, and a new group of nobility arrived in the kingdom, notably the various members of the Baux family of Provence who came to Naples with the Angevin king.

This document provides a continuation to the document SOUTHERN ITALY (1), and shows nobles families in the southern half of the Italian peninsula in the 11th to 14th centuries, after the fall of the Lombard principalities, in the area of the present-day Italian regions of Basilicata, Calabria, Campania, Molise and Puglia.

The nobles in question were vassals of the dukes of Apulia, later kings of Sicily.

In addition, a large number of references have been found to nobles in southern Italy which have not yet been allocated geographically.

They are set out in Chapter 6 of the present document.

They were also joined by families from northern Italy, in some cases related to the Aleramici dynasty of the Marchesi di Monferrato and Marchesi del Vasto e Saluzzo, who arrived in southern Italy as a result of dynastic marriages into the ruling family of the Norman counts of Apulia and Sicily, or as adventurers.

The Norman dynasty of the kingdom of Sicily became extinct in the legitimate male line at the end of the 12th century.

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"Riccardus comitis Drogonis filius atque Roberti Guiscardi totius Calabrie et Apulie atque Sicilie ducisatque fili eiusdem Rogeri et ipsius heredis dapifer" donated property inherited from "soror mea Aumburga" to the bishop of Nicastro and the church of San Pietro founded by "sorore mea Aumberga" by charter dated 1101, witnessed by "Ugo de Claromonte, Rogerius Roberti ducis filius Dragus frater Alexandri Alexander nepos Riccardi dapifer".It is difficult to be sure whether this omission was intended or only represents unintentional drafting errors.Just over 100 years after the Catalogus was written, Charles I King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] compiled a "Book of Fees" which lists properties which had been confiscated from the supporters of his predecessor, King Manfredo, and were restored to their previous owners by the new regime.The arrival of the Hohenstaufen dynasty from Germany brought a new wave of nobles in its wake, the most influential of which was the family of the Bavarian Markgrafen von Hohenburg.Existing Norman families who supported King Federigo (the future Emperor Friedrich II) retained their positions, but dissatisfaction with the new rulers triggered rebellions and confiscation of their properties which followed the suppression of the revolts, for example the case of the Conti di Sanseverino.

"Riccardus comitis Drogonis filius atque Roberti Guiscardi totius Calabrie et Apulie atque Sicilie ducisatque fili eiusdem Rogeri et ipsius heredis dapifer" donated property inherited from "soror mea Aumburga" to the bishop of Nicastro and the church of San Pietro founded by "sorore mea Aumberga" by charter dated 1101, witnessed by "Ugo de Claromonte, Rogerius Roberti ducis filius Dragus frater Alexandri Alexander nepos Riccardi dapifer".

It is difficult to be sure whether this omission was intended or only represents unintentional drafting errors.

Just over 100 years after the Catalogus was written, Charles I King of Sicily [Anjou-Capet] compiled a "Book of Fees" which lists properties which had been confiscated from the supporters of his predecessor, King Manfredo, and were restored to their previous owners by the new regime.

The arrival of the Hohenstaufen dynasty from Germany brought a new wave of nobles in its wake, the most influential of which was the family of the Bavarian Markgrafen von Hohenburg.

Existing Norman families who supported King Federigo (the future Emperor Friedrich II) retained their positions, but dissatisfaction with the new rulers triggered rebellions and confiscation of their properties which followed the suppression of the revolts, for example the case of the Conti di Sanseverino.

In several cases, the sources hint at family connections between these newly established nobility and the Hauteville family of the dukes of Apulia/kings of Sicily, but not all such relationships can be traced precisely.